Blurb Thursday #2 (What’s hot and what’s not)

After talking up the blurb of A. Star’s Wish For Me (which I’ve also raved about here), today I’ll showcase the blurb of a dystopian, young adult novel that grabbed my attention.

Aftermath (After the Fall Dystopian series Book 1)

by Tom Lewis
Publication date: March 28, 2015
Purchase Link: Amazon
Genres: dystopian, yound adult

Official Synopsis

The end of the world came fast. Between the time the warning had sounded on the TV, till when 16-year-old Paige O’Connor awakened sometime later, civilization had been crushed.

The attacks had come by “them” – those things in the ships in the sky that had appeared suddenly, and without warning.

And as Paige would soon discover, the attacks had only been the beginning.

Aftermath is the first book in the new After the Fall dystopian action series, which follows a young girl’s struggle for survival in the wake of civilization’s collapse, and humanity’s domination by an alien race of beings.

My take

First off, the cover is spot on. From the cold color texture to the solid font, it’s an example of excellent dystopian branding. Also,

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But,

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The blurb is good, but I felt it’s lacking in some ways. Instead of giving an outline of the plot, what it more or less explains is the notion of “dystopia”: “The end of the world came fast”“civilization had been crushed”“humanity’s domination by an alien race” (which, apparently, are called “them” in the book).

As a reader, I’m left wondering: What makes this book different from all the young adult dystopian novels out there?

I have noticed that, when writing a synopsis, authors sometimes play up their genre more than the story. When the cover brands the book well, some key words are enough to brand the genre. The rest of the blurb should show the reader why this story stands out from the rest, and vague references such as “the attacks had only been the beginning” and “a young girl’s struggle for survival” are staple notions in a dystopian book (doesn’t everyone struggle for survival when aliens take over?)

I read some of the Goodreads reviews and saw that there’s much more to this book than meets the eye (blurb-wise) that, if added, would give a clearer identity to the plot.

If you’d like more info on this book, here’s the purchase link: Amazon

You can check out its Goodreads page as well.

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What do you think of this blurb? Would it make you click its purchase link?

A visual tour of Alonissos (the setting of Fate Captured)

The culmination of the story of Fate Captured, Book 1 in my Greek Tycoons series, takes place in the beautiful island of Alonissos. Having just returned from my annual visit, it’s only fair I pay tribute with a post choked in stunning visuals.

Location

Alonissos belongs to the cluster of the Northern Sporades along with Skiathos and Skopelos. But, unlike these two larger islands that attract throngs of tourists, Alonissos retains the breath-taking natural beauty of the North Aegean islands without the noise, the clutter and the sometimes offputting touristy feel.

Map image – http://www.greeka.com

To me, the island of Alonissos holds emotional value as it is the place where my husband proposed back in 2002. What’s more, it’s the place that inspired me to start penning my Aegean Lovers series. It was only fair that I chose that setting. And, luckily, it’s an ongoing affair. I visit it every summer as my in-laws have a summer house there. Want to take a tour?

The Beaches

Alonissos has sixteen beaches one can access by car and countless bays accessible only by boat. Here are the most popular.

Agios Dimitrios

Image via http://www.wondergreece.gr

Leftos Yialos

Leftos

Tzortzi Yialos

Image via http://www.wondergreece.gr

Megalos Mourtias

Meg. Mourtias

Kokkinokastro

Image via e-thessalia.gr

Votsi

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Chrissi Milia

Chrissi

Milia

Image via http://www.wondergreece.gr

Alonissos in Mythology

The island’s ancient name was Ikos, and its first inhabitant was Stafylos (meaning “grape”) the son of Dionysus and Ariadne. Its second name “Achilliodromia” references Achilles whose father, Pileas, is said to have been buried there. Variances of that name are still seen as names of inns or restaurants: Liadromia, Hiliodromia. The Achaeans sailed from here to reclaim Helen of Troy and also Jason set off from Alonissos for his quest for the Golden Fleece.

The Old Village

Image via Sightseeing in Alonissos

Offering a magnificent view of the Aegean, Hora (as the locals call the Old Village) bears the trademark windy-street/steep-stairs combo of the Greek islands. More artsy than touristy, the little shops and cafes offer quality products, full of local charm.

Image via Sightseeing in Alonissos

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Patitiri

Image from Sightseeing in Alonissos

The picturesque central port of Alonissos is also the current capital of the island. Its name means “wine-press” in Greek.

Agii Anargiri

The chapel of the Holy Unmercenaries (Agii Anargiri) is tucked in a verdant slope at the edge of a cliff with breath-stealing views of emerald waters. It’s the place that I just have to visit each and every year. I also chose this as the location for a wedding that takes place in Fate Accompli.

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The lilac

Alonissos pushes the envelope forward where colors are concerned. Instead of the traditional white and blue of the Aegean, here you see lots of lilac (my favorite color) as a main color or in trimmings.

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Image via http://www.wondergreece.gr

The Marine Park

The National Marine Park of Alonissos and Northern Sporades is the first marine park established in Greece and a member of the Network of Marine Protected Areas in the Mediterranean. Mostly known for its efforts to protect the Mediterranean monk seal (Monachus Monachus) it is also the natural reserve for hundreds of plants and animals.

I captured a picture of a Monachus Monachus seal back in 2008, and it’s one of my most treasured pictures.

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How to get there

From Athens, you can take a flight to the island of Skiathos and then a flying dolphin or a catamaran to Alonissos. Alternatively, you can use the passenger bus service to reach the port of Agios Konstantinos (100 miles from Athens – one and a half hours drive) and then take a flying dolphin, ferry or catamaran for a three-hour trip to Alonissos. There are also direct flights to Skiathos from various European cities.

With such beauty how can I not be inspired to write my love stories in this setting?

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For a sensual romance story set on this breath-taking island, pick up Fate Captured, free through Kindle Unlimited. Available on Amazon, April 21.