Useful KENP Tips

Those of you who interact with me often know that I’ve been revising Fate Accompli, my one published book, after attending online writing courses. During this time, I haven’t been promoting the book at all. After shedding 8,000 words, I re-uploaded the spicy version manuscript and started tweeting about it effectively, but that’s material for a subsequent post.

After promoting for a single day on Twitter, I saw a 14 and then a 438 KENP hit on my KDP Reports’ blue graph.

UK_market_KENP

Naturally, I was thrilled, but when I got a big fat zero the next couple of days, you can guess the questions running in my mind:

  1. what percentage of my book does 438 represent?
  2. can I find how many KENP pages Amazon has my book down for?
  3. did 10 people borrow the book and read 43 pages each, hated it and dropped it, or
  4. did one person devour the entire book in one day?

I found the answer to the first two questions in Molly Greene’s latest blog, which I recommend you read in its entirety as it sheds more light onto the KENP business. (Actually, follow her blog as all of Molly’s posts are totally worth your time.)

How to find each book’s KENP count

Bookshelf

  • Go to your Bookshelf
  • Click on the Promote and Advertise tab next to the title you want to check

KENP_Count

  • Scroll down and check the Earn Royalties box (on the left). The last line shows your book’s count.

Fate Accompli’s spicy version has a 508 KENP count. The story itself has to be a bit over 450 pages, as I have a rather lengthy first chapter of the next book in the Aegean Lovers series added at the end. Establishing that fact, I was even more curious about the high KENP hit I had, so I used the market filters on the Reports’ page. Guess what? The 14 plus 438 (total 452) KENP came from the UK.

Not having seen any mobility in that market for ages, aren’t I legit to conclude that it was one UK-based person who borrowed the book and finished it in two days rather than a bunch of British readers who all decided to borrow on that day (when no American did) read some and dropped the book?

Now, after some more days of tweeting effectively (I’m stressing that as I have to pitch my upcoming post), that’s what my all-markets’ blue graph looks like:

All_markets_KENP

The 205 plus 271 (total 476) KENP hits came from the US market, again in consecutive days, which again makes me think that it’s more likely a single person read the entire book (they add to the book’s total KENP count and the next day was silent) *doing the happy dance*.

Update: I should mention the formula to calculate your profits from KENP reads. This is:

KENP x 0.0058

(or 0.006 according to some)

Thank you Effrosyni Moschoudi for pointing this out in the comments!

My conclusions

  • If I get consecutive KENP hits, adding up to the book’s KENP count, most likely that means a reader went through the entire book.
  • Twitter being my only promotional tool, it seems I have found a way to “clickable” tweets.
  • My aim is “clickable” tweets not a large number of retweets. I’ve been having plenty of those all this time (and I’m grateful to my loyal writer friends/tweeps) but they didn’t lead to sales or borrows.
  • The link I’ve used when tweeting was that of the book’s landing page, not its Amazon page. It seems to be working better.
  • If a person starts reading Fate Accompli, it’s quite likely she’ll finish it very soon *still happy dancing*
  • Use all market and title filters available on your Reports’ page for more solid conclusions on KENP results.

What’s your experience with KENP so far? Has it given you more insight into your audience or promo efforts?

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Fate Accompli - Clean Version

Fate Accompli is available in two heat versions: Clean & Spicy

14 Examples on How to Sharpen Your Sentences (reblogged)

Pic picked up right from Jenni with an “i

Cheeky, cheeky writer Jenni Wiltz finished a draft and all she could think of is “word bloat!” Who hasn’t been there? But Jenni is not one to sit and ponder for long. After some serious line-editing, she shares her takeaway from this process in an excellent blog post I had to share. What drew me to her site? Her clever tagline:

“They say modern writers need a “platform.” I have plenty of these in the closet, but apparently they aren’t the right kind.”

So, without further ado, here’s Jenni for you 🙂

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I just finished the third draft of a book that’s going to take at least five drafts to finish. The biggest problem until now was sheer word bloat. I knew I couldn’t make the additions the book needs until I made a buttload of subtractions. Imagine trying to evaluate the health of a garden when it’s so full of weeds and overgrown shrubbery you can’t see a single stalk or bloom. All you know is there’s an awful lot of green shit underfoot.

To hack away at that green shit, I focused on sentence-level editing. This meant fixing (or deleting) things like:

  • Sentences that use imprecise verbs or descriptions
  • Sentences that convey the same information in two different ways
  • Bloated sentences with filler words like “just,” “only,” “that,” etc.

This is no small task. And a lot of writers never do it.

These days, a popular piece of advice for self-published writers is to PUBLISH AS MUCH AS YOU CAN, LIKE, A MILLION WORDS A YEAR AND IF YOU DON’T NO ONE WILL EVER DISCOVER YOUR WORK LET ALONE BUY IT AND YOU’LL NEVER MAKE A DIME AND THIS IS THE ONLY WAY TO PROVE YOU’RE REALLY COMMITTED.

This strategy might work for some people, but I’m not one of them. For starters, I don’t see how it’s possible to publish that quantity of words that have been edited and polished to perfection. As Miracle Max said in The Princess Bride, “You rush a miracle man, you get a rotten miracle.”

How to Look at Revision: Don't Rush Your Miracle.

For the spot-on examples right from Jenni’s own manuscript, click here for the rest of the article.

When you’re done, come back here to learn about

The 4 Elements of a click-worthy title” and what to do

When beta readers come with an agenda

and if you don’t want to miss any posts, just subscribe on the upper left corner.

Thank you for reading!